An online resource based on the award-winning nature guide – maryholland505@gmail.com

Archive for February 10, 2010

Welcome to a photographic journey through the fields, woods, and marshes of New England

Here I’ll be sharing some of my favorite photographs from my forthcoming book Naturally Curious. I’ll be updating my blog periodically with new images, new stories, and more glimpses of New England in all seasons.

BARRED OWL COURTSHIP

Listen to the Barred Owl here:

I awoke in the middle of the night to the "who-cooks-for-you, who-cooks-for-you-all" call of a barred owl right outside my bedroom window. Courtship has begun for these birds of prey, right on time. In March or April, after breeding takes place, two or three eggs will be laid in the hollow of a tree, or perhaps a stump or the old nest of a hawk, crow or squirrel. Meanwhile, listen for the call of Vermont's most common owl


Welcome to a photographic journey through the fields, woods, and marshes of New England

Here I’ll be sharing some of my favorite photographs from my forthcoming book Naturally Curious. I’ll be updating my blog periodically with new images, new stories, and more glimpses of New England in all seasons.

Hobblebush Leaf Buds Hobblebush (Viburnum lantanoides) is a shrub whose branches often bend and take root, tripping or hobbling those who pass by – hence, its common name. The white showy flowers of this plant are impressive, as is the red color of its leaves in autumn, but my favorite part of hobblebush is its buds. Unlike the buds of most shrubs and trees, both the leaf and flower buds of hobblebush lack protective scales, and are referred to as “naked” buds. They are fuzzy and uniquely shaped; the two leaf buds are pointed and the flower bud is the swollen, round structure in the middle.