An online resource based on the award-winning nature guide – maryholland505@gmail.com

Archive for February 23, 2010

Welcome to a photographic journey through the fields, woods, and marshes of New England

Here I’ll be sharing some of my favorite photographs from my forthcoming book Naturally Curious. I’ll be updating my blog periodically with new images, new stories, and more glimpses of New England in all seasons.

BROWN CREEPERS SINGING

Brown creepers are small (brown) birds that are often spotted spiraling up tree trunks (as opposed to the downward direction of nuthatches), searching for insects hidden behind bark.  In February the males begin their territorial singing, and today while hiking in a coniferous forest I heard a creeper’s high-pitched tumble of notes above my head.  Brown creepers sing from a verticle position and, according to C. Davis in Living Bird (1978), their song can be heard from as far away as 394 feet.  Brown creeper singing peaks March - May and nest building (behind loose bark) begins in late May.

Brown creepers are small (brown) birds that are often spotted spiraling up tree trunks (as opposed to the downward direction of nuthatches), searching for insects hidden behind bark. In February the males begin their territorial singing, and today while hiking in a coniferous forest I heard a creeper’s high-pitched tumble of notes above my head. Brown creepers sing from a verticle position and, according to C. Davis in Living Bird (1978), their song can be heard from as far away as 394 feet. Brown creeper singing peaks March - May and nest building (behind loose bark) begins in late May.

To hear a brown creeper’s song, go to http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/brown_creeper/id and scroll down to “Typical Voice” on left hand side, click on arrow.