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Archive for February 27, 2012

Cedar Waxwing Feather

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Several of the secondary flight feathers (inner wing feathers) of Cedar Waxwings and Bohemian Waxwings possess tiny, brilliant red tips. (As Dale Martin pointed out, there is a bit of white next to the red tips of Bohemian Waxwings’ feathers, but those who guessed either waxwing should take a bow.) These “waxy droplets” give the bird its common name, along with its love of red cedar berries.  These drops of “wax” are actually the widened, flattened ends of the feather shafts.  The color is derived from a carotenoid pigment, astaxanthin, which they get from their diet (cedar fruit and other berries).  Younger birds possess fewer red tips than older birds. Ornithologist Peter Stettenheim conjectures that since the waxwing’s ability to find berries probably improves with age, the number, size and coloration of these tips may indicate the birds’ foraging ability.  Research in the 1980’s indicates that these red tips serve as markers in mating, providing visual clues to potential mates about each other’s age, which correlateswith egg size, clutch size, as well as ability to find and deliver food.  Cedar Waxwings tend to mate with individuals of their own age.