An online resource based on the award-winning nature guide

Goldenrod Spindle Gall

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There are three fairly well-known galls (abnormal plant growths caused by a variety of organisms) on goldenrod – the goldenrod ball gall (round swelling in stem caused by a gall fly), the goldenrod bunch gall (leaves at top of plant are bunched up into a mass caused by a gall midge) and the goldenrod spindle gall (elliptical stem swelling caused by a moth).  The amazing thing about insect galls is that not only do they provide shelter for the insect, but they are nutritious and serve as the insect’s food supply as well.    The spindle-shaped galls are home to the larval stage of the goldenrod gall moth (Gnorimoschema gallaesolidaginis).  In the late fall the adult female moth lays an egg on a low goldenrod leaf, where it overwinters. The larva, or caterpillar, hatches out the following spring and makes its way from the now dead leaf to a newly sprouted goldenrod, where it eats its way through a bud and into the stem.  The goldenrod plant reacts to this activity by forming an elliptical swelling, or gall, around the area where the larva took up residence. The larva feeds and develops all summer.  Prior to pupating, it chews a tunnel all the way through the gall (this is the only stage in which the moth has chewing mouthparts), and then spins a silk cover for it.  The larva then returns to the cavity in the middle of the gall and pupates.  In the fall the adult moth crawls down the tunnel,  bursts through the thin layer of silk and then mates and lays eggs.

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