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Archive for November 19, 2012

Barred Owl Pellet

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Having posted a barred owl regurgitating a pellet, it only seemed fitting to post the pellet itself.  Many birds, not just birds of prey, form pellets that consist of the indigestible parts of prey they’ve eaten – fur, feathers, claws, teeth, fish scales, exoskeletons of insects and crustaceans and parts of plants.  In general, the larger the bird, the larger the pellet – the pellets of most birds of prey are an inch or two, and they’re roughly half an inch for a small songbird.  With birds of prey, likely spots to find pellets are beneath roosting and nesting sites.  In addition to getting rid of indigestible matter, the casting of pellets is thought to improve the health of a bird by scouring its throat, or gullet.  It takes anywhere from 6 to 16 hours after a hawk or owl has eaten for it to cast a pellet, and it may be necessary for the bird to do so before it eats its next meal.  Dissecting pellets is an effective way of determining a bird’s diet.  The pellet of a golden eagle in Oregon contained a leg band that had been placed on an American wigeon (a species of duck) about four months previously, a thousand miles away! (Pictured are a 1 1/2-inch barred owl pellet and the contents, minus the fur, of several pellets.)