An online resource based on the award-winning nature guide

Mink Tracks & Dens

If you take a walk along a small wooded stream that has many fallen trees along its banks, you can expect to find mink tracks somewhere along it. These wetland-loving weasels dig their dens in river banks, often under tree roots, and judging from their tracks, visit them frequently. It is not unusual for one mink to have several dens which it uses as resting spots along a stream. Mink spend a lot of time in the water hunting for fish, aquatic insects and crayfish. Mink are good swimmers and can dive as deep as 16 feet. Tracks will run along the frozen sections of a stream, and then disappear into the water, only to reappear on the ice further downstream when the mink decides to travel on solid ground again. 1-8-13 mink tracks along river IMG_0175

3 responses

  1. Kathy Schillemat

    Yes, we were hoping to see some mink tracks yesterday when we were out exploring, but no such luck this time.

    We did find a place where it looked as if a grouse had done a mink or otter like slide as it traveled across the ice and snow in a wetlands area.

    January 8, 2013 at 2:43 pm

  2. We have perfect mink habitat so I’ll be on the lookout for mink tracks. I am always on the lookout for tracks, but so far, can only identify the more common ones – raccoon, opossum, deer, bear, etc.) We have coyotes, but we also have a lot of hunters and they keep the coyotes moving so they don’t stay in the area for long. We have mountains all around us and they go higher up to escape the hunters.

    January 8, 2013 at 2:52 pm

  3. viola

    We know we have mink in our area as we see them occasionally. We’ve also found the remains of their meal, the left over shells of crayfish in the marsh or pondside. What we weren’t prepared for was the damage in the chicken coop. The mink went for the jugular, drank the blood, but left the carcass. Later caught in a havaheart, the animal hissed and growled. It had a beautiful thick, shiny dark brown coat.

    January 8, 2013 at 7:51 pm

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