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Honeybee Scavenger

2-10-14 chickadee & bee33 174If the weather warms up sufficiently in January or February, honeybees take advantage of it and use this opportunity to leave their hive to rid themselves of waste that they have accumulated since their last flight and to remove the bodies of dead honeybees. They don’t fly very far before dropping either their waste or their dead comrades on the snow. This ritual is quickly noted and taken advantage of by animals that are not hive dwellers and need constant fuel in order to survive the cold. Black-capped chickadees are one of these animals – the chickadee in this photograph repeatedly landed on the hive body, and if a dead bee was available at the hive entrance, the chickadee helped itself to it. Otherwise it would survey the snow in front of the hive and then dart down to scoop up a bee in its beak before flying off to a branch to consume its nutritious meal. (Note dead bees at the hive opening, awaiting being taken on their final flight. Screening keeps mice out, but allows bee to enter and exit.) Thanks to Chiho Kaneko and Jeffrey Hamelman for photo op.

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4 responses

  1. Dianne and Ed

    This is AMAZING AMAZING……………Thank you so very much for your blog. 🙂 Dianne

    February 10, 2014 at 3:40 pm

  2. Nothing in Nature is wasted. The perfect recycling system.

    February 10, 2014 at 4:45 pm

  3. So fascinating!

    February 10, 2014 at 6:25 pm

  4. Jean Harrison

    What great recycling!

    February 10, 2014 at 8:12 pm

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