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Mystery Photo

8-26-14 mystery blog 230Do you know what made the vertical marks on these cattail leaves? All guesses welcome (under “comments”) – Tomorrow’s post will reveal the answer.

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27 responses

  1. djaffe@newenglandwild.org

    Dragonfly’s?

    August 26, 2014 at 11:51 am

  2. Tom Stearns

    Ermine scratches when they are reaching for yummy old dried bug bodies. Can remember what they are called.

    Tom Stearns High Mowing Organic Seeds http://www.highmowingseeds.com tom@highmowingseeds.com 802-224-6301 cell 802-472-6174 ext. 114 desk

    August 26, 2014 at 11:57 am

  3. Sharyn Tullar

    My guess is birds, like red wing black birds and sparrows.

    August 26, 2014 at 11:59 am

  4. Claudia Rose

    American Bittern

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    August 26, 2014 at 12:07 pm

  5. tedjerome

    North American Panda (rare) clawmarks.

    August 26, 2014 at 12:07 pm

    • Cindy

      Hilarious! I’m guessing then our Panda is quite small – as well as rare.

      August 26, 2014 at 12:56 pm

  6. Nannette

    could dragonfly and damsel flies have made these marks?

    August 26, 2014 at 12:20 pm

  7. Gordon Gribble

    My guess is a Fusarium fungus or other blight

    August 26, 2014 at 12:45 pm

  8. Susan Sawyer

    I think these are the scars left by damsel or dragonfly laying eggs. But I don’t know what kind. Many just drop their eggs in the water, but I’ve watched Lestes females ovipositing in water lily leaves.

    August 26, 2014 at 12:45 pm

  9. Bill On The Hill...

    Red wing blackbirds, they are amongst them throughout the day on my pond. BF…

    August 26, 2014 at 12:47 pm

  10. Woodpecker?

    August 26, 2014 at 12:53 pm

  11. Rachael Cohen

    Clawmarks from red-winged blackbirds?

    August 26, 2014 at 12:54 pm

  12. Kelly Dwyer

    Dragonflies!

    August 26, 2014 at 12:57 pm

  13. Roseanne Saalfield

    Sand , as the tide rises and falls ? ( but then the marks might be diagonal )

    August 26, 2014 at 12:59 pm

  14. Peter Hollinger

    Dragonfly eggs. Maybe a darner?

    August 26, 2014 at 1:05 pm

  15. laura luckey

    cat claws

    August 26, 2014 at 1:23 pm

  16. Alonso

    I would guess oviposition marks where insects laid their eggs. This might be one of the dragonflies that inserted its eggs into the cattail leaves and left those marks.

    August 26, 2014 at 1:39 pm

  17. Heidi

    I would have to agree with the Panda theory.

    August 26, 2014 at 1:39 pm

  18. Joanne Cote

    Insect damage, due to either larvae or eggs inside tubes of the reed

    August 26, 2014 at 2:00 pm

  19. Grasshoppers

    August 26, 2014 at 2:09 pm

  20. Chris Randall

    A red-winged black bird pecking to find insect larvae inside the cattails to eat.

    August 26, 2014 at 2:46 pm

  21. Brian

    Dragon Flies ovipositing (laying eggs)

    August 26, 2014 at 3:15 pm

  22. Brenda Sloane

    Redwings

    August 26, 2014 at 4:17 pm

  23. Could it be a red-wing blackbird claws?
    Love your posts.

    Don salvatore

    August 26, 2014 at 5:43 pm

  24. Simyra insularis
    What do we win? đŸ™‚

    August 26, 2014 at 8:01 pm

  25. jini foster

    most likely one of the female Mosaic Darner Dragonflies who deposited the eggs with her hooklike ovipostior as she went in a downward line along the leaves of the Flag plant, I think it is

    August 27, 2014 at 11:27 am

  26. jini foster

    whoops didn’t read cattails-so interested in the pattern-it IS early in the day for my eyes, but I still do think it is the same insect-curious to know!!!

    August 27, 2014 at 11:28 am

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