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Mossy Rose Gall Wasp Larvae Cease Feeding

10-31-14 mossy rose gall IMG_0404In the spring, the 4mm-long cynipid gall wasp, Diplolepis rosae, lays up to 60 eggs (through parthenogenesis) inside the leaf bud of a rose bush. A week later, the eggs hatch and the larvae begin feeding on the leaf bud. This stimulates the abnormal growth of plant tissue, and a Mossy Rose Gall, covered with a dense mass of sticky branched filaments, is formed. The gall provides the larvae with food and shelter through the summer. In late October, when the Mossy Rose Gall is at its most colorful, the larvae stop eating and pass into the prepupal stage, in which they overwinter inside the gall. In February or March, the prepupae undergo a final molt and become pupae. If the pupae aren’t extracted and eaten by a bird during the winter or parasitized by another insect, adult wasps exit the gall in the spring and begin the cycle all over again.

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2 responses

  1. Marie Kirn

    All that and SO beautiful!!! Nice to have a little magnificence on this post-election down day. Oh, dear!

    I’m grateful for love in my life, and send some to you. Marie

    November 5, 2014 at 12:52 pm

  2. Penny March

    GREAT photo!! (Better than Charley E’s) Terrific lighting!

    November 5, 2014 at 12:56 pm

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