An online resource based on the award-winning nature guide

Stoneflies Drumming

2-22-16 stonefly 019Stoneflies spend the larval stage of their life in streams. When the larvae mature, they crawl out of the streams they grew up in, split their larval skins and emerge as winged adults, ready to mate. Stoneflies are unique among aquatic insects in that there are different species that emerge in all months of the year. Most species mature in warmer months, but some do so during warm spells in winter and there are two families (referred to as winter stoneflies) that emerge only at this time of year, perhaps because of the scarcity of predators.

Recently, perhaps due to the warm weather this past weekend, large numbers of stoneflies  emerged. In places, the snowy banks of open streams were littered with half-inch adult stoneflies whose new skins were drying.  This entomological exodus from the water typically takes place at night, to avoid being eaten by terrestrial insectivores and birds.  After their adult skin dries, winter stoneflies can be seen crawling on top of the snow as they search for a mate.

In many species, male and females locate each other by tapping the tip of their abdomen upon the substrate, a process referred to as “drumming.” Any stoneflies in contact with that substrate will feel the vibrations of this drumming. Male and female drumming patterns are specific for each species and for each sex. Male stoneflies initiate drumming and females answer. This means of auditory communication is closely related to the “songs” of crickets, grasshoppers and katydids. The difference is that the sound waves of the terrestrial insect songs travel through the air and are loud enough for humans to hear, whereas the sound waves of stonefly drumming travels through a solid medium and is inaudible to us.

Naturally Curious is supported by donations. If you choose to contribute, you may go to http://www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com and click on the yellow “donate” button.

Advertisements

3 responses

  1. So interesting! Glad to learn this, thanks, Mary.

    February 22, 2016 at 11:45 pm

  2. Tom Durkin

    Do the winter stoneflies have no wing? The picture looks wingless. I know the summer stoneflies have wings?

    February 24, 2016 at 2:22 pm

  3. If you look closely, you’ll see that its wings are flat against its thorax and abdomen – hard to see – you can sort of make out some fuzzy veins in them.

    February 24, 2016 at 3:27 pm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s