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Beavers Seeking Herbaceous Plants

3-16-16 beavers out IMG_1252A recent light snow provided an opportunity to confirm that northern New England beavers have gained access to land and are seeing the sun for the first time in several months. They, along with any beavers living north of the 39th parallel, may well reap some benefit from the change in our climate. Further south, there is no real winter and beavers do not have to cope with a limited amount of stored food for there is usually no ice on ponds. Milder winters and early springs mean more time for Northeastern beavers to access herbaceous food and fresh bark, and less time locked under the ice.

Unbeknownst to many, a large portion of a beaver’s spring, summer, and fall diet consists of herbaceous food – grasses, sedges, ferns, fungi, berries, mushrooms, duckweed and even algae. When beavers first leave their ponds in the spring, one of the first foods they head for is skunk cabbage, as it is one of the earliest flowering plants to emerge (often when snow is still on the ground). Beavers also relish the new foliage of aspen, willow and alders. When they are accessible, the rhizomes, leaves and flowers of both yellow and white pond lilies are favorite foods. Come late fall, when lush greenery has disappeared, beavers up their intake of bark (cambium) and store a pile of branches on the bottom of the pond   close to their lodge, where they have underwater access to it all winter.

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2 responses

  1. mariagianferrari

    I just read a new picture book about the longest beaver dam, Build, Beaver, Build! by Sandra Markle, which was very information. Thanks for the post!

    March 17, 2016 at 8:15 am

  2. Chris

    Mind readers.

    Chris

    March 17, 2016 at 10:10 am

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