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Mystery Photo

3-23-16  mystery photo by Reuben Rajala  2016Do you know what the white objects are?  Photo (by Reuben Rajala) taken along the Androscoggin River in Gorham, NH recently.

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46 responses

  1. Midge Eliassen

    Patches of floating snow

    March 23, 2016 at 7:34 am

  2. A lovely example of ice having been rounded as it moves with the current, commonly called ice pans. Very nice.

    March 23, 2016 at 7:35 am

  3. Dexter Harding

    Yes! We see those ice pancakes occasionally along the Wildcat River in Jackson this time of year, going round and round in the eddies, bumping against each other and so becoming closer and closer to perfect circles. Especially on very cold, spring mornings it seems.

    March 23, 2016 at 7:39 am

  4. Anthony L Brainerd

    pancake ice

    March 23, 2016 at 7:41 am

  5. Ann

    Looks pancake ice we see here in michigan

    March 23, 2016 at 7:41 am

  6. J. Griffin

    I think these are frozen lily pads

    March 23, 2016 at 7:44 am

  7. They look like frozen foam cakes, I think the foam is a side effect of tannins in the water? I found some swirling around in a local brook this winter.

    March 23, 2016 at 7:45 am

  8. Ice puddles, formed by ice and the lapping of water which make them round discs with raised edges

    March 23, 2016 at 7:46 am

  9. pkallin@roadrunner.com

    Looks like floating aquatic plants, possibly watershield or another small water lily, with a light dusting of snow.

    Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

    Naturally Curious with Mary Holland wrote:

    > a:hover { color: red; } a { text-decoration: none; color: #0088cc; } a.primaryactionlink:link, a.primaryactionlink:visited { background-color: #2585B2; color: #fff; } a.primaryactionlink:hover, a.primaryactionlink:active { background-color: #11729E !important; color: #fff !important; } /* @media only screen and (max-device-width: 480px) { .post { min-width: 700px !important; } } */ WordPress.com Mary Holland posted: “Do you know what the white objects are?  Photo (by Reuben Rajala) taken along the Androscoggin River in Gorham, NH recently. Naturally Curious is supported by donations. If you choose to contribute, you may go to http://www.naturallycuriouswithmaryhollan

    March 23, 2016 at 7:46 am

  10. Bill

    I’m going with ice plates, ejected as frozen puddles when river levels rise.

    March 23, 2016 at 7:47 am

  11. Lisa White

    Ice discs

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    March 23, 2016 at 7:56 am

  12. Patsy

    No, I don’t , but I can’t wait to find out!

    March 23, 2016 at 8:10 am

  13. Schuyler Gould

    Really large ravioli?

    March 23, 2016 at 8:12 am

  14. Bill Farr

    Looks like ice pancakes to me. Who’s got the butter & syrup? :<)
    BF…

    March 23, 2016 at 8:13 am

  15. What looks like lily pads are really ice cakes, rounded as they bump against each other 0n the move downstream. The Whetstone Brook in Brattleboro, Vt. produced some beauties this winter.

    March 23, 2016 at 8:18 am

  16. Mike Levine

    Ice disks formed by eddies

    March 23, 2016 at 8:21 am

  17. I call it pancake ice. I see it often in the Huntington River in eddies along the shore as ice accumulates and grinds itself round against other pieces of ice.

    March 23, 2016 at 8:26 am

  18. Kimberly

    Ice pancakes!

    March 23, 2016 at 8:31 am

  19. Alice Pratt

    I call them “ice Pizzas Crusts”….have seen large ones near the bottom of a fish ladder …..swirling…(moving water), in Hanover, MA

    March 23, 2016 at 8:47 am

  20. Betsy Janeway

    About the wonderful video of the drumming grouse: He’s a lot prettier than Donald Trump but seems to have a similar temperament. Comment by my son, Roger Janeway.

    March 23, 2016 at 8:59 am

  21. Robert Spencer

    ICE

    March 23, 2016 at 9:04 am

  22. David Thomas-Train

    lilypads leafed-out early in the warm weather, then frosted and killed and set adrift by the subsequent cold

    March 23, 2016 at 9:18 am

  23. david putnam

    discs of ice

    March 23, 2016 at 9:22 am

  24. mystery photo: frozen foam on the Androscoggin — plates of foam spin in eddies, irregularities are trimmed off until they form rough disks

    March 23, 2016 at 9:30 am

  25. Place mats made by grinding rotating bits of floating ice. Perfect to put under easily spoiled salads (potato, tuna fish) in midsummer.

    March 23, 2016 at 9:39 am

  26. Jane Swift

    Ice Lilies! I’ve discovered them before, always in a pool at the base of a waterfall.

    March 23, 2016 at 9:43 am

  27. Charlotte Stetson

    I have a similar photo, taken by Flood Brook in Surry, Maine. In my photo, the “pies” appear more 3-dimensional and foamy.

    March 23, 2016 at 9:52 am

  28. Kathy Schillemat

    I’ve heard them called Ice Pancakes–I can’t remember how they are formed.

    March 23, 2016 at 9:57 am

  29. Guy Stoye

    mystery objects are “rafts” of frozen bubble foam?

    March 23, 2016 at 10:00 am

  30. These are ice rounds, probably at the bottom of a small waterfall.

    March 23, 2016 at 10:01 am

  31. Mark Dindorf

    I think these are frozen disks of river foam or scum, formed by frothing suspended river sediments which spin & grow in small eddies in the current. As temperatures drop, these disks freeze and may be bumped out of their eddies by other River debris or changes in River levels. In the picture they have accumulated in another eddy or current trap along the banks. That’s what I think they are.

    March 23, 2016 at 10:39 am

  32. Sue

    Look like frosted lily pads! Sue Wetmore in Florida

    Sent from my iPod

    >

    March 23, 2016 at 11:43 am

  33. Laura Beltran

    Ice circles, formed in the eddies of rivers. I have seen these in northern New York.

    March 23, 2016 at 12:29 pm

  34. Stephen Maddock

    These are ice blocks caught in a whirlpool where the edges are rounded off to form ice “plates.” Confession: I saw this explained on WMUR’s web page yesterday.

    March 23, 2016 at 12:43 pm

  35. Lisa

    Ice cakes!

    March 23, 2016 at 1:40 pm

  36. k

    frozen lily pads?

    March 23, 2016 at 1:43 pm

  37. k

    I love reading other people’s comments – especially the funny guesses like “ravioli!”

    March 23, 2016 at 1:46 pm

  38. Ed Parsons

    Water shingles, caused by freezing of water in motion. I have seen them in a cove on Squam Lake, but not in a river.

    March 23, 2016 at 3:07 pm

  39. JoAnn BERNS

    Methane bubbles – light them! 🙂

    March 23, 2016 at 3:44 pm

  40. jenny simone

    melting ice or some sort of dead fish

    March 23, 2016 at 4:21 pm

  41. Bridgit

    They’re ice circles / ice discs. Not common. Occur in Northern regions in river eddys, as the melting ice pieces swirl and bump they become perfectly circular.

    March 23, 2016 at 6:45 pm

  42. Paper plates left over from first spring picnic..

    March 23, 2016 at 8:48 pm

  43. graceelambert

    Dear Mary, Thank you for the interesting, informative and fun posts you write. I look forward to reading them every morning, I love seeing the neat photos that accompany each post, and I enjoy learning new things about nature through your writing. I’m grateful to my Vermont friend, Jan Frazier, who introduced me to your blog last year.

    Sincerely, Grace Lambert Sequim, WA

    On Wed, Mar 23, 2016 at 4:28 AM, Naturally Curious with Mary Holland wrote:

    > Mary Holland posted: “Do you know what the white objects are? Photo (by > Reuben Rajala) taken along the Androscoggin River in Gorham, NH recently. > Naturally Curious is supported by donations. If you choose to contribute, > you may go to http://www.naturallycuriouswithmaryhollan” >

    March 24, 2016 at 10:00 am

    • Thank you so much, Grace. Delighted that my posts have some relevance clear across the country!

      March 24, 2016 at 11:02 am

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