An online resource based on the award-winning nature guide

Pickerel Frogs “Snoring”

4-28-16  pickerel frog IMG_9429Pickerel Frogs emerge early in the spring from their muddy, pond bottom hibernacula, and mate in April and May in the Northeast. As part of the mating ritual, males call to attract females, with the calls resonating inside their internal vocal sacs located between their tympanum (ear drum) and foreleg (unlike Spring Peepers and American Toads, whose vocal sacs are located directly under their mouths).

These low-pitched calls resemble short “snores.” Occasionally Pickerel Frogs call from under water, but even when they are above water, their calls do not carry very far, frequently making it difficult for human ears to hear them.  Their call is similar to that of the Leopard Frog’s but lacks the short grunts of a full Leopard Frog call.  You can compare these two calls (and several others) by going to http://langelliott.com/calls-of-frogs-and-toads-of-the-northeast/ (Sound recording © Lang Elliott – langelliott.com)

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6 responses

  1. kpmaxon

    Thanks for the Lang Elliott site! I could listen all day. Saturday night I stopped on the low spot of Van Sicklen road in S. Burlington to revel in the peeper chorus…

    April 28, 2016 at 7:33 am

  2. Robert Reeve

    when in doubt, listen to the frogs and toads…!

    http://musicofnature.com/calls-of-frogs-and-toads-of-the-northeast/

    April 28, 2016 at 8:10 am

  3. Walking My Path: Mindful Wanderings in Nature

    Thank you for this! I love frogs so much. We have Northern Leopard Frogs and Western Chorus Frogs here in NM, and a couple toads – Woodhouse is one. I love your frog picture!
    Peace
    Mary

    April 28, 2016 at 10:44 am

  4. Sandy DeRosa

    My 7th grade students have been enjoying and learning from these fantastic posts of what is currently happening in nature in New England! Thank you! Sandy

    April 28, 2016 at 1:19 pm

  5. Angela Garand

    I loved all the toads and frog sounds, so much easier to figure them out now, Thx

    April 28, 2016 at 1:37 pm

  6. Sandy DeRosa

    Your posts are a regular part of our science class routine. Students loved hearing the pickerel frog snore. Many thanks!

    May 17, 2016 at 2:33 pm

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