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Archive for June 9, 2016

Wolf Spiders Closely Guarding Egg Sacs

5-24-16  wolf spider 008Spinnerets, located at the far end of a spider’s abdomen, serve as spigots through which silk is exuded, but they also have another function for some species of arachnids.  Female wolf spiders use their spinnerets to grasp their eggs sacs, enabling them to carry and guard their eggs until they hatch.   In order not to damage the eggs when she moves, the spider tilts her abdomen up slightly.  Catching prey with this added encumbrance and in this position must take great skill.  Once the wolf spider’s eggs hatch, the young climb up on top of the abdomen where they spend their first days before dispersing. (Nursery web spiders also carry their egg sacs with them, but clasp them with their jaws, or chelicerae, and small, leg-like appendages called pedipalps.)

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