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Pileated Woodpeckers Fledging

7-5-19 junior about to fledge 0U1A0832When your children start to get this feisty, it’s time for them to leave the nest!

Between three and a half and four weeks of age, Pileated Woodpecker nestlings fledge. Their flight feathers are about 75% of adult size when they depart. Some fledglings are capable of sustained flight when they leave the nest, while others may need several days before they can fly any distance.

Initially parents and siblings stay in the vicinity of the nest, but once the young can fly well, they follow adults everywhere. All the young may stay with both parents, or the parents may split up and each take some of the young. The fledglings will remain with their parents into September. (Photo: male Pileated Woodpecker nestling about to fledge while his father watches.) Much gratitude to Amber Jones and Dave Bliven for sharing their deck, their sweet dog Briggs and their magnificent view of this Pileated Woodpecker family with me.

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14 responses

  1. David Govatski

    Great series of photos and posts about these woodpeckers.

    July 5, 2019 at 6:57 am

  2. Louise Garfield

    I have thoroughly enjoyed the photos and facts about the pileated family !

    July 5, 2019 at 7:01 am

  3. Terrific series about these woodpeckers

    July 5, 2019 at 7:07 am

  4. hellomolly

    Thank you for allowing us a window into the lives of these awesome birds! What a treat.

    July 5, 2019 at 7:32 am

  5. Gina

    Thank you so much for this great chapter about the woodpeckers!
    A year or two ago I was working in a nearby field when the ‘kids’ were out and about but still clearly needy. The noise! A half-dozen woodpeckers flying across the field, chasing each other from tree to tree, back and forth! It was quite amazing. (o:

    July 5, 2019 at 8:16 am

  6. What a priceless photo! Thanks so much Mary.

    July 5, 2019 at 8:26 am

  7. Alice Pratt

    The parents ‘grin and bear it.’ You can’t get too annoyed with a young bird that’s so cute! All these photos and posts have been awesome…so enjoyable to see them up-close. Thank you, Mary!

    July 5, 2019 at 9:08 am

    • Alice Pratt

      Is he too young to borrow some of his dad’s hairgel?

      July 5, 2019 at 8:11 pm

  8. Tamson

    Great photo! We had a nest across from the park entrance booth a few years ago. One of my co-workers started calling it “The Maternity Ward” and when it was quiet, we’d take turns watching the activity. I got pics, but nothing as good as yours.

    July 5, 2019 at 9:19 am

  9. Oh, my! What a comically adorable little critter! I have indeed really enjoyed your weeklong focus, and all the information and close-up views of these wonderful birds!

    July 5, 2019 at 9:40 am

  10. Oh, great capture, Mary – what a cutie!

    July 5, 2019 at 8:19 pm

  11. Harriette Griffin

    Great series of pileated woodpecker photos with wonderful info accompaniment! Thank you all for sharing, but nowt of all, Briggs.

    July 6, 2019 at 5:14 pm

  12. Bill On The Hill

    Terrific study on a fascinating bird Mary. In my (20) years on the mountain here in N. Central VT, I’ve seen this bird only on several occasions & they were all very brief encounters. The pileated woodpecker seems to be a most secretive creature in the bird world.
    Thanks Mary,
    Bill… :~)

    July 7, 2019 at 10:15 am

  13. Evergreen Erb

    Thanks for the ongoing saga of the Pileated family. What great pictures and natural history information. I am lucky enough to see them very often, so maybe I’ll get to see some family groups this summer.

    July 7, 2019 at 11:16 am

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