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Archive for February 15, 2021

White-winged Crossbills Foraging

Most of New England is privileged to see White-winged Crossbills (Loxia leucoptera) only during the winter, when these nomadic birds forage south of their far northern boreal forest breeding grounds for conifer seeds during poor cone crop years. 

Spruce seeds are the preferred food of White-winged Crossbills. Their crossed mandibles allow them to pry open cone scales and they then extract the seeds with their tongue.  Individuals can eat up to 3,000 conifer seeds a day!

These birds have been documented nesting every month of the year.  As long as they can find a source of food that is sufficient for egg formation and that is likely to remain for the next month or so when they’ll be feeding nestlings, they will breed.  The larger the spruce cone crop, the longer a span of time crossbills typically nest.  Nesting usually declines by November although young do occasionally fledge in December and January. (Photos of a male White-winged Crossbill by Erin Donahue.)

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