An online resource based on the award-winning nature guide – maryholland505@gmail.com

Beavers & Pounding Headaches

Beavers will do their very best to secure fresh cambium as long as they have access to land.  Even when thin ice starts to form, they are undeterred.  You can hear them as they use the top of their heads to bump up against the ice in order to break through and create a pathway to shore.  Thanks to Kay Shumway, a beloved friend, I had ten good years of observing this behavior every late fall/early winter.  Eventually the thickness of the ice confined the beavers to their lodge and the surrounding water beneath the ice, but until that happened you could count on seeing the sun glinting off the ice shards that inevitably ended up on top of the beavers’ heads.

11 responses

  1. Catherine Fisher

    What a great photograph, and how wonderful to have a friend to share in observing this phenomenon, Mary.

    December 10, 2021 at 8:04 am

  2. Brooke beaird

    I’ve always loved the life of beavers and have flowed their activities for 40 years in Vermont. Sadly I’ve recently met someone who spends some time trapping them in Pomfret. Not sure if or how to challenge that practice..

    December 10, 2021 at 8:05 am

  3. Jean Knox

    Thank you, Mary, for this unusual information about beavers and wonderful photo. I greatly enjoy your posts!

    On Fri, Dec 10, 2021 at 8:00 AM Naturally Curious with Mary Holland wrote:

    > Mary Holland posted: ” Beavers will do their very best to secure fresh > cambium as long as they have access to land. Even when thin ice starts to > form, they are undeterred. You can hear them as they use the top of their > heads to bump up against the ice in order ” >

    December 10, 2021 at 8:08 am

  4. As ALWAYS (really!), a great photo and another fascinating piece of curiosity about the natural world. I so appreciate your work. And, fellow readers, this IS Mary’s work. I was distressed to find the automatic advertisement in the email today and hope all readers will make a small, regular or larger, one-time donation to Naturally Curious so Mary is not obliging to these kinds of ads. It is easy! Just click on the “donate” button on this page. Mary’s work is so vital to how I see the world around me and I’m happy to support her in that work.

    December 10, 2021 at 8:26 am

  5. Lucy Hull

    Thanks, Mary! The image gave me a chuckle. I can relate: ice does feel good on a headache.
    How can we support you? If we “make the ads go away” on WordPress, how much of those funds come to you? Is there another way to do this?

    December 10, 2021 at 8:30 am

  6. They are such a great model of determination!

    December 10, 2021 at 9:04 am

  7. Margo Nutt

    Wonderful photo!

    December 10, 2021 at 9:18 am

  8. Alice

    That’s a wonderful photo! I hope the Beaver’s eyes, nose & ears don’t get cut during that head-bumping.

    December 10, 2021 at 9:23 am

  9. Mary, Thanks so much for all your writing and explorations! I’m sorry to see the advertisements and that caused me to comment on the blog today asking people to support your work financially.

    All good here, given this crazy world, and trust the same is true for you,

    John

    >

    December 10, 2021 at 9:36 am

  10. Gaylee Amend

    Good morning. thank you for another interesting story and photo of beaver with an ice pack. I’m glad in your rare case to see “ad support” for more consistent funding of your irreplaceable postings. Best of luck to you in your continuing generosity. GA

    On Fri, Dec 10, 2021 at 8:01 AM Naturally Curious with Mary Holland wrote:

    > Mary Holland posted: ” Beavers will do their very best to secure fresh > cambium as long as they have access to land. Even when thin ice starts to > form, they are undeterred. You can hear them as they use the top of their > heads to bump up against the ice in order ” >

    December 10, 2021 at 9:40 am

  11. Deborah Luquer

    What a fabulous picture

    December 11, 2021 at 9:36 am

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