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Common Hazelnuts Maturing

There are two species of native hazelnuts that you are likely to come upon in the Northeast – Beaked Hazelnut, Corylus cornuta, (see https://naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com/2017/08/14/beaked-hazelnuts-maturing/) and American Hazelnut, Corylus americana. The nuts of both of these species are edible.

The fruit of American Hazelnut is produced in clusters of one to five, with each half-inch brown nut enclosed in a hairy, leaf-like husk with ragged edges. These nuts are maturing now, in September and October.  They are best harvested while the husks are still green, as once they turn brown, there will be stiff competition for them from local wildlife.

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4 responses

  1. Diane Alexander

    What a timely message this is for me. I have 2 hazelnut trees which produced multiple nuts this year. As I licked my lips imagining the wonderful flavor of my homegrown nuts, one day I looked and they were entirely gone. Every nut had been absconded by winged thieves. I waited too long to harvest them. Just wait’ll next year! Happy to have helped the wildlife.

    September 12, 2022 at 8:18 am

  2. Ben Steele

    Hi,
    I found an underground bee’s nest that had been dug out, probably by a bear. It was on Alegra’s trail off of Goodfellow Road in Hanover. I can send pictures or a detailed description if you want.

    September 12, 2022 at 8:57 am

    • I’d love to see a photo of it! Thanks so much. My email address is maryholland505@gmail.com. Many thanks. Any particular reason you think it was dug out by a bear?

      September 12, 2022 at 2:50 pm

  3. Alice

    The husk is so frilly and pretty. Wish I knew where there is a hazelnut tree.

    September 12, 2022 at 9:24 am

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