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Mystery Photo

Pine Soap

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The bubbles you see is are the formation of a crude soap on the bark of a White Pine. During dry periods salts, acids and other particles from the air coat the surface of the bark. When it rains, these mix with the water and form a solution. The foam is from the agitation of the mixture when it encounters a barrier (bark) during its flow toward the ground.

As to why this occurs primarily on pines, botanist Ken Sytsma states, “Pines produce a whole array of natural hydrocarbons for herbivory defense. One set of these is “pine tars” that have been used in the past to make soap. As precipitation works its way down trunks of pines, they accumulate these compounds. What you may be seeing is natural pine soap in the making.” (Thanks to Brenda & Steve Hillier for Mystery Photo idea.)

 

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Mystery Photo

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What is this white foam at the base of this White Pine, and how did it get there?  Please submit answers under “Comments” on my blog site, http://www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com.


Mystery Photo

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Whose scat??? (Hint: Size – ¾” diameter; Location – near body of water) Please respond on Naturally Curious blog site, www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com under “Comments.”

 


Mystery Photo

IMG_1812Can you identify what is in this photo?  Submit answers on the Naturally Curious blog site, under “Comments.”  I.D. will be provided tomorrow!

Naturally Curious is supported by donations. If you choose to contribute, you may go to http://www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com and click on the yellow “donate” button.


Mystery Photo

5-23-17 blue scat by Adam Riquier IMG_3657 (002)Normally I am well acquainted with the natural history of any Mystery Photo I post, but today is an exception.  I have no idea whose scat this is, nor the origin of its color.  A forester, Adam Riquier, discovered it in Lake Placid, NY. He writes that “The forest type is hardwoods (maple beech, birch with some red spruce) right at an edge where it transitions to a cedar forest. It was taken three or four days ago, so there are no berries out yet. There is some blue stain fungus on downed hardwood nearby. The scat is roughly golf ball sized.”

In hopes that a Naturally Curious reader might be familiar with this oddity, I secured Adam’s permission to post his photograph.  If you think you know whose scat it is, and/or the origin of its color, please share your expertise with us!  (The scat was found at least a mile from any houses, not eliminating the possibility of (blue) rat poison having been ingested, but making it fairly unlikely.)

Naturally Curious is supported by donations. If you choose to contribute, you may go to http://www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com and click on the yellow “donate” button.


Mystery Photo

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What are these holes and who made them?  Please post your answers on Naturally Curious website under “Comments.”

Naturally Curious is supported by donations. If you choose to contribute, you may go to http://www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com and click on the yellow “donate” button.


Mystery Photo

5-8-17 mystery photo 019Who has been digging here, and what have they been digging for? This hole is roughly 4” wide at the surface of the ground and about 2” deep. There is a marble-size indentation in the soil at the bottom of the hole. Careful scrutiny will give you another hint.

Please post your answer under “Comments” on Naturally Curious’s blog site. (Difficulty: 10 on a scale of 1-10, 10 being most difficult)

Naturally Curious is supported by donations. If you choose to contribute, you may go to http://www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com and click on the yellow “donate” button.