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Mystery Photo

Fisher Dines On Two Flying Squirrels

3-1-18 fisher scat and flying squirrel tails 049A3138 (1)Although Coyote tracks led me to this kill site, the Coyote was only inspecting the remains of two Flying Squirrels. Fisher tracks and scat confirmed that it was the predator.

Deciphering the story in the snow was possible through a familiarity with certain details of both the predator and prey. A Flying Squirrel’s tail is distinctively flattened, and the fur on it is very light and silky. There is no mistaking it for any other animal’s. (This would be difficult to discern from a photograph!) One entire squirrel’s tail was in a depression, where the squirrel had unsuccessfully sought shelter in a tunnel it had started to dig. The second tail had been ripped into bits and pieces. The Fisher claimed its kill and/or territory by depositing its characteristically small, twisted, pointed scat at the kill site. (Not an uncommon practice of many predators.)  Always fun to be able to piece together some of the drama that occurs nightly in our woods and fields.

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Mystery Photo

2-28-18 mystery photo 049A3141Who’s the predator (scat)? Who’s the prey (tail part)?  Both are approximately 1 1/2″ long. Please post responses on blog (www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com ) under “comments.”

Naturally Curious is supported by donations. If you choose to contribute, you may go to https://naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com and click on the yellow “donate” button.


Rolling White Pine Cone

2-9-18 white pine cone 049A2427

Leave it to NC readers to recognize yesterday’s Mystery Photo! I was impressed with the fat tire track guesses – something I would never ever recognize! With the help of the wind and a gentle slope, a White Pine cone rolled down a hill, leaving the imprint of its spirally-arranged scales in a repetitive pattern. The fall cone crop of many conifers this year was extreme, so your chances of coming across this track are great this winter.

All species of pines produce cones with scales that overlap each other like fish scales. During cold, damp weather, these scales close tight to protect the seeds within them from bad weather and hungry animals. When the weather is conducive to germination (warm and dry) the scales open, allowing seeds to escape. Even after cones fall from the tree, their scales can still open and close.

Naturally Curious is supported by donations. If you choose to contribute, you may go to https://naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com and click on the yellow “donate” button.

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Mystery Photo

2-7-18 mystery photo 049A2427

A favorite past-time of many people who traverse woods and fields in winter is deciphering the tracks that they come across. Do you know who or what made this track? (Hint: diameter = 5”)

Naturally Curious is supported by donations. If you choose to contribute, you may go to http://www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com and click on the yellow “donate” button.


Mystery Photo

1-19-18 mystery photo 049A2150Who has been here and what have they been doing?  (Hint: inset photo is of Sensitive Fern, Onoclea sensibilis, fertile frond & spores)

Please respond by clicking on “Comments” at the bottom of this post on my blog, www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com .

Naturally Curious is supported by donations. If you choose to contribute, you may go to http://www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com and click on the yellow “donate” button.


Spinning Ice Discs

12-18-17 mystery photo by Martha Kent, submitted by Paula Kelley 20171215_151548(3) (003)The latest Mystery Photo is of an ice disc – a large disc of ice spinning in a river. It’s thought that this relatively rare natural phenomenon is likely caused by cold, dense air coming in contact with an eddy in a river, forming discs ranging anywhere from 3 to 650 feet in diameter.

While eddies contribute to the spinning, they are not the only cause. If they were, small discs would spin faster than big discs, and this is not the case. Discs of all sizes rotate at roughly the same rate. One would also expect that discs in still water, where there aren’t any eddies, wouldn’t start spinning, but they do.

The melting of the ice disc contributes to its spinning as well. When an ice disc starts to melt, the melted ice water is denser than the ice, and thus sinks below the disc. This movement causes the water to spin, which in turn spins the disc. (Thanks to Martha Kent for photo submitted by Paula Kelley)

 


Mystery Photo

12-18-17 mystery photo by Martha Kent, submitted by Paula Kelley 20171215_151548(3) (003)What do you think is going on here? Answers should be entered under “Comments” at the bottom of this post on my blog at www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com. (Photo by Martha Kent, Winooski River, Richmond, VT on 12/15/17)

On another note: I have recently received a number of inquiries regarding how one can donate to my blog. Everyone has been so generous with my daughter and grandson’s fund that I have hesitated to put a donation option back on my posts, but I have been encouraged to do so and it will return in January. Meanwhile, in response to those who have recently inquired about supporting my Naturally Curious blog with a donation, you can go to www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com and click on “Donate,” or send a check made out to me to 134 Densmore Hill Road, Windsor, VT 05089. Thank you so very much.