An online resource based on the award-winning nature guide

Uncategorized

Spring Birth

Yam  470In addition to mallards, star-nosed moles, chipmunks and a host of other animals, my daughter Sadie is about to give birth. I will be taking a few days off to be on hand for her. I apologize for the lack of posts for the next week or so, but nature calls.


ANIMAL MOUTHS: Second Book in Children’s Series Released

5-12-15 AnimalMouthsSome of you may have seen Animal Eyes, which was the first of a series of children’s books I am writing about animal anatomy. Just as Animal Eyes took a look at the adaptive differences among different animals’ eyes, Animal Mouths describes the wide range of animal mouths. From birds to butterflies, different mouths and mouth parts are illustrated with photographs and their adaptations for different diets are discussed. Carnivores, herbivores and omnivores are included, as well as an educational section at the end of the book which provides children with photographic/textual “mix and match” activities that reinforce information presented in the main text. Available from the publisher (click on cover image to the right), independent bookstores (most will order if it’s not in stock), online and from me (from those of you nearby). This fall the third book of this series, Animal Feet, will be released.


Bloodroot Pollination

4-30-15  bloodroot 084Thank you for all your guesses, a vast majority of which were right on the mark. Bloodroot, Sanguinaria canadensis, is one of the first spring ephemerals to bloom. On sunny days its petals are open wide, closing at night when the temperature drops and on cloudy, rainy days (when pollinating insects are less apt to visit). Only pollen is produced by Bloodroot – no nectar. Even so, insects, especially mining bees, visit and collect pollen, and in the process often pollinate the flower.

The methods which Bloodroot employs in order to become pollinated are impressive, to say the least. While cross-pollination is preferable, self-pollination is better than nothing. To limit self-pollination, the female stigma becomes receptive before the male anthers of the same flower produce pollen. Furthermore, during the first few days of the flower opening, the anthers bend downward toward the outside of the flower, away from the receptive stigma, where they are easily accessible to insects. If insect pollination doesn’t take place by the third day of flowering, however, the anthers bend inward, contacting the stigma and self-pollinating the flower.

Naturally Curious is supported by donations. If you choose to contribute, you may go to http://www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com and click on the yellow “donate” button.


Mystery Photo

4-28-15 mystery photo2 050What flowering plant starts out looking like this, and within days develops into one of our most familiar spring ephemerals? (Guesses can be made under “Comments.”) Tomorrow’s post will identify today’s.

Naturally Curious is supported by donations. If you choose to contribute, you may go to http://www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com and click on the yellow “donate” button.


Flowering Skunk Cabbage Serves as Warming Hut for Pollinating Insects

4-24-15  skunk cabbage 013As Skunk Cabbage grows, it absorbs oxygen, and this allows it to produce heat through a process known as thermogenesis. This heat is responsible for the fact that Skunk Cabbage is one of the earliest plants to flower in the spring.

Skunk Cabbage’s flower has two components – the flower-bearing, round spadix and the hood-like spathe that surrounds it. The spadix is able to maintain its temperature at about 68°F., creating a little warming hut inside the spathe for the few insects out this early in the spring. Fueled by the reserved starch in the plant’s underground rhizome, the spadix is able to exceed the temperature outside the spathe by as much as 77°F. for a period of two to three weeks. The combination of the heat produced and the dark, heat-absorbing spathe can cause the snow around the plant to melt. If the ambient temperature drops below 37.4°F., the plant can shut down the heating mechanism until the air temperature rises again. (Thanks to Sadie Brown for photo op.)

Naturally Curious is supported by donations. If you choose to contribute, you may go to http://www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com and click on the yellow “donate” button.


Beavers See Daylight

4-17-15 beaver 281Imagine sharing dark, damp, cramped living quarters under pond ice with at least three other individuals for four to five months. Then imagine an increasing amount of light filtering through ice that is getting thinner and thinner. Finally the day comes when you are able to break through the ice and crawl out of the water onto land. The sudden brightness and heat provided by the sun, the availability of fresh vegetation to eat and the opportunity to thoroughly groom oneself in the open air must make an unimaginable sensory impact on a beaver in early spring.

Naturally Curious blog will have a brief hiatus until next Thursday, 4/23, so that a Naturally Curious Day by Day (my next adult book) chapter deadline can be met.

Naturally Curious is supported by donations. If you choose to contribute, you may go to http://www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com and click on the yellow “donate” button. Thank you.


Waxwings Supplementing Sugary Fruit Diet With High-Protein Insects

4-3-15 bohemian waxwing IMG_2383The diet of both Cedar and Bohemian Waxwings is primarily sugary fruits throughout most of year. Research shows that they can subsist on this diet exclusively for as many as 18 days. However, in winter when feeding on fruits, they also feed on buds and available insects. In warmer months, waxwings will fly out over water from exposed perches, much like flycatchers, and snatch emerging aquatic insects such as mosquitoes, midges, mayflies, caddisflies and dragonflies out of the air. They also glean for vegetation-borne insect prey, such as scale insects. At this time of year they are taking advantage of winter stonefly hatches over open streams. (photos: bohemian waxwing & stonefly)

Naturally Curious is supported by donations. If you choose to contribute, you may go to http://www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com and click on the yellow “donate” button.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,448 other followers