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Posts tagged “Barred Owl

Barred Owl Pellet

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Having posted a barred owl regurgitating a pellet, it only seemed fitting to post the pellet itself.  Many birds, not just birds of prey, form pellets that consist of the indigestible parts of prey they’ve eaten – fur, feathers, claws, teeth, fish scales, exoskeletons of insects and crustaceans and parts of plants.  In general, the larger the bird, the larger the pellet – the pellets of most birds of prey are an inch or two, and they’re roughly half an inch for a small songbird.  With birds of prey, likely spots to find pellets are beneath roosting and nesting sites.  In addition to getting rid of indigestible matter, the casting of pellets is thought to improve the health of a bird by scouring its throat, or gullet.  It takes anywhere from 6 to 16 hours after a hawk or owl has eaten for it to cast a pellet, and it may be necessary for the bird to do so before it eats its next meal.  Dissecting pellets is an effective way of determining a bird’s diet.  The pellet of a golden eagle in Oregon contained a leg band that had been placed on an American wigeon (a species of duck) about four months previously, a thousand miles away! (Pictured are a 1 1/2-inch barred owl pellet and the contents, minus the fur, of several pellets.)


Barred Owl Coughing Up Pellet

Roughly six to ten hours after consuming prey, owls, hawks and many other birds cough up a small pellet that consists of the indigestible bones, fur, etc. of the prey it’s eaten. The barred owl in this photograph was in the process of coughing up such a pellet. While pellets are hard to come by (they are well camouflaged on the forest floor), owls caught in the act of producing them are even more rare!


Barred Owl Diet

This is pure conjecture, but here goes. Barred Owls are known to consume small mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish and invertebrates. I have repeatedly encountered a Barred Owl lately near a pool of water in a brook that has all but dried up. Fish have become trapped in this pool due to the dryness of the summer, and are easy pickings for predators. Even though studies have shown that fish are a very small percentage of a Barred Owl’s diet (2.5% in owls from New Jersey, New York and Connecticut during the breeding season), I am betting that the owl that I flushed yesterday that was perched right next to the isolated pool in the brook was spending the day (and night?) at his favorite fishing hole. Three times it took off from its perch as I approached, but only flew a few feet away each time. Perhaps fish or frogs kept it from disappearing further into the woods.


Barred Owl Pellet and Droppings

There are two subjects in this photograph – one is dark and round (left) and the other is whitish-yellow and brown, and string-like (right).  One came out of a barred owl’s mouth; the other came out the opposite end.  Do you know which is which?  The round, brown object is an owl pellet which owls (and many other birds) cough up roughly 6 – 10 hours after consuming a meal.  It is just about odorless, and consists of the indigestible parts of the owl’s prey — bones, teeth and nails wrapped in the fur of, in this case, a vole. (The fur keeps sharp bones from tearing the owl’s esophagus when the pellet is coughed up.)  Different owl species have different sized pellets, and typically the larger the owl, the larger the pellet. (The average barred owl pellet is 2 ½” long and 1” wide.)   A great gray owl pellet (3”-4” long and 1 ½” wide) I found contained the skulls of three small rodents, in addition to other bones.  The whitish substance is the owl’s semi-solid waste. It consists of white uric acid and feces which are excreted through the bird’s cloaca, an opening that is used not only for waste disposal, but also for mating and egg laying.