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Posts tagged “frogs

Tracks Reveal Spotted Salamander Defense Mechanism

12-11-13  spotted salamander & fox tracks3 007Red Foxes have a very diverse diet – birds, small mammals, snakes, frogs, eggs, insects, fish, earthworms, berries, fruit — the list is endless and this diversity is part of the reason that foxes thrive in almost any habitat. However, the fox whose tracks I was following recently passed up a meaty meal – that of a Spotted Salamander. The story the tracks tell suggests that the fox dropped the salamander after unearthing it from its hibernaculum and carrying it some distance. It’s likely that it had detected the sticky white toxic liquid that Spotted Salamanders secrete from poison glands in their skin when they are threatened. Unfortunately, detection did not occur in time to save the salamander’s life. Either its experience with the fox and/or freezing temperatures killed the salamander, preventing it from going back into hibernation. (Note red fox tracks to right of salamander.)

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Spring Peepers Still Calling

Although Spring Peepers emerged from hibernation about two months ago, on warm nights the males are still advertising for mates and will continue to do so into June. Let your ears guide you to the peepers as they call repeatedly, often while perched on low vegetation near water. Armed with a flashlight, look for the movement of their vocal sacs as they inflate and deflate as the peepers sing. 


Wood Frogs Arrive at Vernal Pools

After noticing the sudden loud clacking chorus at a nearby temporary woodland vernal pool, I went down to investigate, and there were dozens of wood frogs floating on the surface, as they croaked their duck-like quacks in the hopes of attracting female wood frogs.  As far as I could determine, they were out of luck on this, their first day at the breeding pool, as I don’t believe the females have arrived yet.  One clue was the relatively small size of the floating frogs and it seemed as though every frog was calling (only males call).  Plus, time after time a wood frog would swim up to another wood frog and attempt to grasp it only to have the object of its desire utter a “release” chirp (a call made only when a male clasps another male) and swim rapidly away. 

 


Spring Peepers Calling

I heard my first peeper on March 18th, roughly two weeks earlier than in past years.  These tiny members of the treefrog family begin mating rituals shortly after the end of hibernation. The males gather at small pools by the hundreds. Each male establishes a small territory and begins calling the familiar high-pitched “peep” quite frequently. The louder and faster he peeps, the better his chances are of attracting a receptive female. Males usually compete in trios, and the male with the lowest-pitched call usually starts the vocal competition.  If you look closely at the peeper in the photograph you can see some snow fleas hitching a ride.  


Spring Peepers Calling

You may well have heard the single “peep” of a male spring peeper emanating from the woods recently.  It does seem odd to hear this call now, often far from water, as we associate it with spring courtship.  This phenomenon occurs so regularly in the fall that herpetologists have given it a name – “fall echo.”  They speculate that peeper calling is spurred by light and temperature conditions, when fall climate conditions are similar to those of spring. 


Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor)

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A gray treefrog starts life off as a ¼”, yellow tadpole. Eventually it may reach 2 ½” in length, and its body will have turned olive green with a red tail. Upon metamorphosing into a frog, the gray treefrog turns a bright emerald green and gradually develops into a mottled gray adult. The two color phases of the maturing frog are so different it’s hard to believe that they are the same species. However, a glance at their large, rounded toe pads tells you that they are at least related. All members of the treefrog family (which includes spring peepers) possess these toe pads, which enable them to cling to rough and smooth surfaces, and to climb up verticle structures, from tree trunks to house windows.


Pickerel Frog

Next to the green frog, the pickerel frog is the most abundant frog in New England. It is often confused with the northern leopard frog, which it closely resembles.  The spots on a pickerel frog’s back are squarish and aligned in rows, whereas the leopard frog’s spots are rounded, and randomly scattered over its back.  In addition, the male pickerel frog has bright orange on the inner surface of its hind legs, which the leopard frog lacks.  The pickerel frog is very sensitive to pollution, so its presence is indicative of good water quality.