An online resource based on the award-winning nature guide – maryholland505@gmail.com

Posts tagged “Hawks

Red-shouldered Hawks Building and Refurbishing Nests

4-5-13 red-shouldered hawk nest IMG_8573With winter temperatures still upon us, it can be challenging to find signs of spring in the hills of Vermont.  However, subtle signs do exist if you know where to look!  Notice the fresh greenery in this nest – it confirms that recent refurbishing has taken place by returning red-shouldered hawks.  Roughly two feet in diameter, a red-shouldered hawk’s stick nest is lined with moss, lichen, bark and conifer sprigs.  Other  items that have been used as building material for these raptors include ears of corn, corncobs, corn husks, tissue paper, nests of songbirds, straw, mullein, leaves, twine, various deciduous tree leaves, entire plants, dried tent caterpillar webs and plastic grocery bags. The pictured nest will serve as a nursery for two to five red-shouldered hawk chicks in about a month’s time, and as the nesting season progresses, sprays of conifers such as the hemlock sprigs you see here will continue to be added.


Sharp-shinned Hawk

1-25-13 sharp-shinned hawk2 IMG_1977If the majority of your diet consisted of one type of food, and that food was concentrated in certain spots, it would make sense to frequent those spots. Bird-eating predators, such as the sharp-shinned hawk, are frequently seen at bird feeders for this very reason. Although not very large — roughly the size of a blue jay (the female is a third again larger than the male) — this accipiter is a formidable predator, and one which causes feeder visitors to either disappear or become motionless for a considerable amount of time. The sharp-shinned hawk is the smallest hawk in North America and derives its common name from the sharp-edged “shin” on the lower part of its legs. Its long tail and short wings make it extremely adept at flying through dense woods in search of small birds.


Red-tailed Hawk Nestling

The Red-tailed Hawk nest that produced two fledglings last year is in use again this spring.  In the past month the nestlings have gone from tiny white powder puffs to nearly equaling their parents in size.  Down is still visible, especially on their heads, but contour feathers are quickly replacing them on other parts of their body. Soon there will be wing stretches and flapping, as well as hopping about on nearby branches in preparation for fledging. 

 


Red-tailed Hawks on Eggs

The red-tailed hawk nest that produced two chicks last summer is once again occupied by a pair of red-tails.  A conifer sprig adorning the outside of the nest was the first clue that a second brood might be in the works.  Yesterday I saw both male and female return to the nest carrying strips of bark, which the female applied to the lining of the nest.  Mid-March is when red-tails typically are building or refurbishing their nest and laying eggs.  They begin incubating as soon as the first (of 2 – 3) egg is laid, with the male and female both participating.  This photograph was taken at the changing of the guard.