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Posts tagged “Larvae

Hickory Tussock Moth

 

Most tussock moths, such as this Hickory Tussock Moth (Lophocampa caryae), are densely covered with hair-like structures called setae that bear microscopic barbs.  Many people are sensitive to these setae and get an itchy rash if they handle a Hickory Tussock Moth.   Even touching the cocoon of a tussock moth can cause irritation, as the setae are woven into it.  Many tussock moths display warning coloration with their black, white, red, orange or yellow setae.  What looks like two Hickory Tussock Moth larvae in the photograph is actually one adult caterpillar (left) and its shed skin (right).   You can find these larvae feeding on hickory, walnut, ash, oak and many other trees in the woods right now.  After spending the winter pupating in a cocoon in the leaf litter, a small spotted, tan moth emerges.


Inside View of Leafcutter Bee Cell – Larva and Pollen Supply


Mystery Photo

This is the larval stage of a very common insect. Do you know what it turns into? (I.D. provided 6-13-12)


Cecropia Moth

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Who would ever associate a lime green caterpillar with colored knobs with a large, brown moth? Thanks to someone’s keen observation, we know that these are both stages of one and the same insect — a Cecropia Moth. It is North America’s largest native moth — individuals with a wing span of over six inches have been documented. Cecropia Moths are emerging from their 3-inch cocoons this month, as are other giant silk moths, including the Luna Moth and Prometheus Moth.
NOTICE: I will be away for the next week in northern Maine, trying to photograph the largest member of the deer family. Blogs will resume on Monday, June 11.


Spotted Salamander Larvae

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A few short weeks ago spotted salamanders gathered at vernal pools to breed and lay eggs.  Since then their eggs have started hatching, and gilled spotted salamander larvae can now be found in these pools. The larvae are major predators and consume many insects and crustaceans, including mosquito larvae and fairy shrimp.  During the next two or three months, these larvae will develop lungs, absorb their feathery gills and begin life as terrestrial amphibians, assuming the temporary pool they’re in doesn’t dry up prematurely. (The two appendages, one on either side of its body in front of the gills, help the larva balance itself until its legs develop.)

 


Noctuid Moth Larva

The striped caterpillar that is crawling along the surface of fresh snow is the larval stage of a noctuid or owlet moth (species unknown).  Noctuids are dull-colored, medium-sized, nocturnal moths that are attracted to lights in the summer. They usually possess a well-developed proboscis (mouthpart) for sucking nectar.  You may be familiar with the common garden pests, cutworms, which are also noctuid larvae.  How this larva survives freezing temperatures I do not know, but I have seen several dozen at a time crawling around on top of the snow.  Note:   Jean Harrison, a fellow nature lover, just identified this larva as  Noctua pronuba, a winter cutworm also known as the greater yellow underwing (moth), a recent immigrant from Europe.


Blackberry Knot Gall

12-28-10      Blackberry Knot Gall

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Winter is a good time to look for galls (abnormal plant growths caused by different agents, including insects, fungi, mites and bacteria) such as the blackberry knot gall, which is much more noticeable when there are no leaves to hide it. Whereas many galls are inhabited by a solitary insect, the blackberry knot gall contains many individual chambers, each containing the larva of the tiny wasp Diastrophus nebulosus. During the spring and summer months, this little wasp deposits eggs into the ridged stems of blackberry which stimulates the plant’s tissue into abnormal growth along the stem. This particular colonial gall can be six inches in length, although two or three inches is more typical (the more eggs that are laid, the larger the gall).  The eggs hatch and the larvae overwinter inside the gall. Adult wasps emerge in the spring and chew their way out of the gall, leaving tiny holes along the gall’s lumpy ridges. In the first photograph you can see where a hungry predator has worked its way into two of the larval chambers.  In the second, multiple chambers and larvae are exposed (sacrificed for the sake of knowledge, but popular food for chickadees on a very cold morning).