An online resource based on the award-winning nature guide

Posts tagged “Mary Holland

Naturally Curious Interview – Part 2

Chris Mazzarella, on his blog “Forest Forward” has posted the second half of his interview with me.  To read it, you can go to http://forestforward.com/2012/05/07/an-interview-with-mary-holland-part-two/


Naturally Curious Program in Concord, NH – March 15

I will be giving my Naturally Curious presentation at the New Hampshire Audubon McLane Center in Concord, NH on Thursday, March 15th at 7 p.m. — a program that includes a talk illustrated with my photographs and natural history collection (skins, skulls, scat, etc.).  The program is free and open to the public.  Hope to see some of you there!


Important Message from the Publisher of NATURALLY CURIOUS

Just a reminder!

You can still order NATURALLY CURIOUS and get it in time for Christmas! We are happy to announce that NATURALLY CURIOUS is in stock at the Trafalgar Square Books warehouse, and you can order your copy through our TSB online bookstore at www.TrafalgarBooks.com. Orders placed by midnight EST on December 18th will receive FREE SHIPPING in the US and WILL arrive in time for Christmas. PLUS get 15% off your order by entering the coupon code SAVE15 at checkout.


You Can Still Order the Award-Winning NATURALLY CURIOUS and Get It in Time for Christmas!

An Important Message from the Publisher of NATURALLY CURIOUS

We are happy to announce today that NATURALLY CURIOUS is still in stock at Trafalgar Square Books, and you can get FREE SHIPPING and have it arrive in the US in time for Christmas if you place your order at www.TrafalgarBooks.com before midnight EST on December 18th. In addition, we are offering 15% off online orders through the holidays—just enter the coupon code SAVE15 at checkout.

We at Trafalgar Square Books are so proud of Mary and her wonderful book NATURALLY CURIOUS! The National Outdoor Book Award for best nature guidebook is a glorious accolade for a naturalist and author whose passion for the outdoors has now inspired thousands.

We sincerely hope that Mary’s book encourages more people to stomp through the snow and mud, wade through tall grasses, squint into the sun, get their hands dirty and their feet wet, and LOOK AROUND, not only when they are on a hike or walking in the woods, but when they are in their yard or walking to the mailbox. There is so much in life to see and appreciate—one only has to know it is there to be amazed.

Happy Holidays from All of Us at Trafalgar Square Books


Great Blue Heron

After many minutes of standing stock still, eyes fixed on the water beneath him, the great blue heron slowly stretched his neck forward, paused and then suddenly thrust his beak into the water.  If you look very closely, you’ll see that he came up with more than a mouthful of aquatic vegetation.

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MYSTERY PHOTOS–THE STORY BEHIND A HAWK’S MEAL?

The first of hopefully many nature mysteries was interpreted and documented with photographs taken by the observers.  A brief explanation of this story in the snow accompanies the photographs.  Mystery photos are welcome–please check the submission guidelines (see link in menu at the top of my blog) prior to sending your photograph/questions.

This story took place in Sharon, Vermont, where Francie and Ron Schmidt commonly observe a pair of mallards on or near their pond.  One morning this winter they spotted a red-tailed hawk perched in a tree, feeding on something.  Being naturally curious, they decided to buckle on their snowshoes and see if they could find any signs of the kill in order to determine exactly what the hawk was dining on.  The pictures they took tell the tale of the misfortune of one mallard drake.

After killing the mallard, the hawk proceeded to pluck many of its feathers while standing on the surface of the snow.  It ate some of the duck’s organs and then took off for the tree with the front end of the duck in its talons, leaving the hind portion behind on the snow along with all the plucked feathers.  The repeated indentations in the snow made by the hawk’s feet and wings indicate that the hawk had a bit of a struggle trying to take off with such a heavy load.  However, it succeeded in reaching the tree, where they had initially seen it.  Having documented this entire story with their camera, the Schmidts decided to return home.  On their way back, they happened to notice a female mallard, most likely the other member of the mallard pair, hiding in a nearby shrub. Later, they photographed the hawk off the corner of their deck when he returned to the kill site

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