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Posts tagged “Mating Insects

Ladybeetles Mating

Many ladybug beetles (ladybeetles) mate in the spring, but some species do so in late summer and fall.  Each species of ladybeetle has its own pheromones for attracting a mate.  Mating can last up to two hours, with the male climbing up and holding onto the female’s outer wings, while intermittently vibrating rapidly (making photographing them somewhat challenging). Their eggs hatch in 4 to 10 days, and within two weeks the larvae have matured into adults.   Most of these aphid-eating predators will spend the winter hibernating, becoming active in the spring, when aphids are available once again.


Dragonflies Mating

7-19-11  Mating Dragonflies

Dragonflies (and damselflies) form what is called a “mating wheel” when they mate.  The male (top) grasps the female at the back of her head with the appendages at the tip of his abdomen. The female then curls her abdomen forward so that its tip reaches his sex organs and receives his sperm.  After mating, the male may continue to grasp the female and accompany her while she lays her eggs, to prevent another male from removing his sperm from the female and then mating with her.