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Posts tagged “Meadow Vole

Distinguishing Vole from Mouse Tracks

12-29-13 vole-mouse tracksMeadow Voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) and White-footed Mice (Peromyscus leucopus) are two of our most common species of small rodents, and they both remain active in winter. Their feet are roughly the same size (approximately ¼ ” wide by ½” long), but the tracks they leave differ slightly, due to their differing gaits. White-footed Mice bound, leaving tracks that have a four-print pattern (parallel larger hind feet in front of smaller, parallel front feet) often with a long tail drag mark in between each set of tracks. Meadow Voles have a variety of gaits, the most common being a trot, which leaves an alternate-track trail, with the hind feet directly registering in the tracks of the front feet. Although voles can also leave a tail mark, they do so much less often than mice. Once the depth of the snow is significant, mouse tracks are more common, as voles tend to travel primarily through tunnels they’ve created under the snow.

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Mice vs. Voles

Mice and voles are commonly lumped together, probably because the differences between them are so slight.  Both are small, furry rodents, but mice generally have large eyes, large ears and long tails (close to or greater than the length of their bodies).  Voles have smaller eyes, smaller ears (often concealed in their fur), and shorter tails.  Voles tend to be active day and night, whereas mice are mainly nocturnal. ( Meadow voles are commonly referred to as “field mice,” which tends to add to the confusion regarding these two groups of mammals!)  There are five species of mice in New England (white-footed, deer, house, meadow jumping and woodland jumping), and four species of voles (meadow, southern red-backed, rock and woodland).


Meadow Vole Trail

Thanks to a dusting of snow we are suddenly privy to the comings and goings of the creatures we live amongst. Some animals are small enough to remain hidden once winter snows arrive, because they live in the subnivean layer between the surface of the ground and the snow.  But when the snow is too shallow for them to create this network of tunnels, their movements are easily discernible.  The pictured meadow vole trail shows where the vole initially tried (unsuccessfully) to tunnel under the snow (it wasn’t deep enough), at the bottom of the photograph.  It then scampered over the grass until it stopped to rest for a moment, leaving a whole body imprint, including its short tail. It’s fairly unusual to see the entire body print of small rodents such as voles and mice, for they are so vulnerable out in the open that they rarely stop long enough to leave one.


Meadow Vole Tunnels

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The melting snow has revealed a labyrinth of vole tunnels, which these little rodents excavate in the snow next to the ground in what is referred to as the subnivean layer.  The tunnels are advantageous in several ways – they provide protection from the wind and cold, and keep the voles hidden from predators.  Voles stay in these tunnels as long as the snow is deep enough, finding food in the form of seeds as they dig through the snow.  Every once in a while you’ll find a dining area (close-up photo) where seeds, in this case, white ash, have been eaten.  If you look closely enough you’ll also see some vole scat.