An online resource based on the award-winning nature guide – maryholland505@gmail.com

Posts tagged “Megachilidae

Leafcutter Bee Cell Leaf Sections

At the risk of boring readers, I wanted to include one final Leafcutter Bee post, showing the two basic shapes that these bees chew out of leaves in order to make their incubator/nursery cells.  There are oblong pieces, roughly an inch long, as well as perfectly round, ¼-inch diameter pieces.  Each cell consists of several layers of oblong pieces rolled lengthwise which are sealed at one end with a round piece of leaf.  The round end pieces appear to be glued into place (perhaps with the pollen/nectar mixture?) at one end of the cell, leaving the opposite end open.  The cells are arranged end-to-end, with the open end of the cell placed against the sealed end of the next cell.  Together they form a nest that is somewhat cigar-shaped and is typically located a few inches down in the soil, or in a cavity.


Leafcutter Bee Cell

Congratulations to those who recognized yesterday’s Mystery Photo!  The tiny green cells are made from the leaves of almost any deciduous trees, and are cut and folded by leafcutter bees (Megachile genus). These solitary bees are about the size of a honeybee, but are much darker, almost black. They construct cigar-like nests (often in soil, holes in wood made by other insects, or plant stems) that contain several cells. After gathering and storing a ball, or loaf, of pollen inside the cell, the bee lays an egg and seals the cell shut. When the egg hatches, the larval bee feeds on the pollen and eventually spins a cocoon and pupates within it. An adult bee emerges from the cocoon and usually overwinters inside the cell. In the spring the bee chews its way out of the cell. Leafcutter bees pollinate wildflowers, fruits and vegetables and are also used as pollinators by commercial growers of blueberries, onions, carrots and alfalfa. (Photo submitted by Jan Gendreau.)