An online resource based on the award-winning nature guide

Posts tagged “Naturally Curious

Second Edition of Naturally Curious Released

e-cover of NC II -100 ppiNine years after the original edition of Naturally Curious came out, a second edition is being released. New photos have been added and updates have been made. I am delighted that it is still in print, especially because numerous schools and colleges have incorporated Naturally Curious into their curricula and I would love to see this practice continue. Thank you for purchasing a copy of the first edition – your endorsement is what made a second edition possible! A short “book trailer” video of the new edition can be seen here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uFtGPjPWKv0 .  If you are interested in purchasing a copy of the new edition, you can order directly from the publisher by clicking on the image of the cover on the Naturally Curious blog site, or you can order it from online bookstores.

Naturally Curious is supported by donations. If you choose to contribute, you may go to http://www.naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com and click on the yellow “donate” button.


A Great Christmas Present!

If you’re looking for a present for someone that will be used year round, year after year, Naturally Curious may just fit the bill.  A relative, a friend, your child’s school teacher – it’s the gift that keeps on giving to both young and old!

One reader wrote, “This is a unique book as far as I know. I have several naturalists’ books covering Vermont and the Northeast, and have seen nothing of this breadth, covered to this depth. So much interesting information about birds, amphibians, mammals, insects, plants. This would be useful to those in the mid-Atlantic, New York, and even wider geographic regions. The author gives a month-by-month look at what’s going on in the natural world, and so much of the information would simply be moved forward or back a month in other regions, but would still be relevant because of the wide overlap of species. Very readable. Couldn’t put it down. I consider myself pretty knowledgeable about the natural world, but there was much that was new to me in this book. I would have loved to have this to use as a text when I was teaching. Suitable for a wide range of ages.”

In a recent email to me a parent wrote, “Naturally Curious is our five year old’s unqualified f-a-v-o-r-I-t-e  book. He spends hours regularly returning to it to study it’s vivid pictures and have us read to him about all the different creatures. It is a ‘must have’ for any family with children living in New England…or for anyone that simply shares a love of the outdoors.”

I am a firm believer in fostering a love of nature in young children – the younger the better — but I admit that when I wrote Naturally Curious, I was writing it with adults in mind. It delights me no end to know that children don’t even need a grown-up middleman to enjoy it!


Naturally Curious Program in Concord, NH – March 15

I will be giving my Naturally Curious presentation at the New Hampshire Audubon McLane Center in Concord, NH on Thursday, March 15th at 7 p.m. — a program that includes a talk illustrated with my photographs and natural history collection (skins, skulls, scat, etc.).  The program is free and open to the public.  Hope to see some of you there!


Important Message from the Publisher of NATURALLY CURIOUS

Just a reminder!

You can still order NATURALLY CURIOUS and get it in time for Christmas! We are happy to announce that NATURALLY CURIOUS is in stock at the Trafalgar Square Books warehouse, and you can order your copy through our TSB online bookstore at www.TrafalgarBooks.com. Orders placed by midnight EST on December 18th will receive FREE SHIPPING in the US and WILL arrive in time for Christmas. PLUS get 15% off your order by entering the coupon code SAVE15 at checkout.


You Can Still Order the Award-Winning NATURALLY CURIOUS and Get It in Time for Christmas!

An Important Message from the Publisher of NATURALLY CURIOUS

We are happy to announce today that NATURALLY CURIOUS is still in stock at Trafalgar Square Books, and you can get FREE SHIPPING and have it arrive in the US in time for Christmas if you place your order at www.TrafalgarBooks.com before midnight EST on December 18th. In addition, we are offering 15% off online orders through the holidays—just enter the coupon code SAVE15 at checkout.

We at Trafalgar Square Books are so proud of Mary and her wonderful book NATURALLY CURIOUS! The National Outdoor Book Award for best nature guidebook is a glorious accolade for a naturalist and author whose passion for the outdoors has now inspired thousands.

We sincerely hope that Mary’s book encourages more people to stomp through the snow and mud, wade through tall grasses, squint into the sun, get their hands dirty and their feet wet, and LOOK AROUND, not only when they are on a hike or walking in the woods, but when they are in their yard or walking to the mailbox. There is so much in life to see and appreciate—one only has to know it is there to be amazed.

Happy Holidays from All of Us at Trafalgar Square Books


Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers Raising Young

If ever there was a species which defied the notion that males don’t participate enough in raising their offspring, it would be yellow-bellied sapsuckers.  Without fail, the male parent keeps up with his mate in numbers of visits to their nesting hole, as well as the amount of food  he collects and brings to the nest. He also partakes in nest cleansing.  Often, when the male and female of a species’ plumage is similar, as in woodpeckers, you will find that that they share rearing responsibilities.  The young of cavity nesters mature more slowly than open-nesters because their nest site is safer.  They also leave the nest at a relatively later stage of development, when they can fly well, even though they have no room to practice flapping their wings.


Great Blue Heron

After many minutes of standing stock still, eyes fixed on the water beneath him, the great blue heron slowly stretched his neck forward, paused and then suddenly thrust his beak into the water.  If you look very closely, you’ll see that he came up with more than a mouthful of aquatic vegetation.

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