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Posts tagged “Nests

Dark-eyed Junco Nest – Day 3


Great Blue Heron Nests

Great Blue Heron chicks are getting big enough so that you can easily observe them (can you find all four?). Occasionally you can even detect flies and other insects buzzing about them, which, given the fact that nest sanitation is not a priority for herons, is not surprising. While the parents do toss the eggshells out of the nest, feces, partly eaten prey and even dead chicks often remain in the nest. Also, parents feed their young by regurgitating into the nest and the chicks will regurgitate when disturbed. Unlike most song birds, Great Blue Herons re-use their nest year after year. It is quickly apparent why they add more sticks and boughs to their nest every breeding season – were that housekeeping for humans was that simple!


Turtle Nest Raid

A hole 4” – 5” deep surrounded by scattered empty, dried up eggshells is a telltale sign of turtle nest predation.  A painted turtle (judging from the size, depth and location of the nest) dug a hole in the bank of a beaver pond last summer and proceeded to lay roughly a dozen or more eggs in it.  After covering the eggs with soil, the turtle returned to her pond.  The eggs hatched in August or September.  Sometimes young turtles immediately climb up through the earth and emerge above ground, but occasionally, this far north, they overwinter in their underground nest and emerge in the spring. A raccoon, fox or skunk discovered this painted turtle nest early this spring (the digging was fresh) and one can only hope that by the time the nest was raided, the young had already exited and headed for the nearby pond.  Research has found that a very small percentage of turtle nests avoid detection by a predator.

 

 

 


Eastern Bluebirds Visiting Nest Boxes

 

Eastern bluebirds  have already been seen checking out nest boxes – behavior that usually isn’t observed for another month or so.   Interestingly, even though most people religiously clean out their bluebird boxes every year prior to the nesting season, experiments show that bluebirds prefer nesting boxes containing old nests.  While breeding has not yet begun, it won’t be long before males will be trying to attract females to their nest site by carrying material in and out of the hole, perching, and fluttering their wings.  After the males choose the nest site and perform for a mate, the females actually do the hard work of building the nest.


Mystery Nest

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I have found several of these nests, always in winter, when leaves are gone and the nests are visible.  They have all been built in shrubs that are on the edge of cornfields, near large bodies of water.  Each nest measures approximately 12” x 12” and there is one side entrance that is about 1 ½” in diameter.  The base consists largely of grape vines cemented together with a bit of mud.  On top of this layer  there is a thick layer of leaves and at the very top are several inches of  finely-shredded plant material. Soft, shredded plant fibers and leaves line the single inner cavity.  Mice, rats or squirrels are the likely builders, but I do not know which.  If anyone has ever found one of these nests occupied, I would love to know the resident’s identity!


Cedar Waxwings Nesting

While the nestlings of most species of birds have fledged, some cedar waxwings are still incubating eggs.  Known for being one of the last species to nest, a waxwing on a nest in mid-August is probably on its second brood.  Both the male and female collect nesting material, but it is the female who does most of the nest construction, and all of the incubation of the eggs.  The cup nest is constructed with a wide variety of material, including twigs, grasses, cattail down, moss, string, horsehair, dead leaves, cloth, shredded bark, roots, leaves, ferns, stalks of herbs and flower blossoms.  Occasionally the exterior of the nest is decorated with ornate plant material, such as the lichen (Usnea , or Old Man’s Beard) in the photograph.