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Posts tagged “pickerel frog

Young Pickerel Frogs Underfoot

9-6-13 young pickerel frog 049If you remember visiting a pond last April or May and hearing a low, snoring sound (the mating call of the male Pickerel Frog) you might see the end results of those snores if you re-visit the pond now. Young Pickerel Frogs the size of quarters are currently abundant on the banks of the ponds in which they grew up, as well as in nearby vegetation. After emerging from the water sometime between July and September, many of these first year frogs move into nearby fields, meadows and damp woods. They are only a few weeks away from burying themselves in mud at the bottom of the pond, where they will hibernate all winter.

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Pickerel Frog

Next to the green frog, the pickerel frog is the most abundant frog in New England. It is often confused with the northern leopard frog, which it closely resembles.  The spots on a pickerel frog’s back are squarish and aligned in rows, whereas the leopard frog’s spots are rounded, and randomly scattered over its back.  In addition, the male pickerel frog has bright orange on the inner surface of its hind legs, which the leopard frog lacks.  The pickerel frog is very sensitive to pollution, so its presence is indicative of good water quality.