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Posts tagged “Scent Marking

Mating Season for Eastern Coyotes

If the increased yelping of eastern coyotes hasn’t caught your attention, you may not be aware that this is the peak of their breeding season. Female coyotes come into estrus once a year, for a period of about 10 days.  For the past two or three months, working up to this, male and female coyotes have been increasing their scent marking.  Occasionally you can find where a female has marked with urine, leaving behind a spot of blood (see photograph).  Eventually she attracts one or more sexually active males, and mating ensues. Something I’ve never witnessed, but would love to, is the howling duet of a pair of coyotes prior to mating.   

 


Red Fox Scent Posts

Every track you see in this photograph was made by a red fox.  Coming from every direction, they all lead to the tree stump. This stump is to foxes what our general stores, post offices and libraries are to us – a place to catch up on all the local news.   Red foxes have these “bulletin boards” scattered throughout their territories. By marking a stump, they convey information such as their age, sex, availability, and much more to every other fox that passes by. Foxes will revisit these posts regularly in order to refresh their scent and update the information they’ve left. They also mark the boundaries of their territory to keep other foxes out.  To save themselves unnecessary hunting, they mark spots where they have previously searched for  prey or cached prey and eaten it, as a signal not to bother to investigate that area. During mating season, which we are in the height of, the fox also uses a scent from a gland on its tail to mark objects. At this time of year the combination of fox urine and glandular secretions create a skunk-like fragrance discernible by the human nose. 


Red Fox Scent Marking

Red foxes (and other animals) communicate in a number of ways, one of which is to scent mark with urine.  These “sign posts,” along with scat, advertise the fox’s presence, its dominance and sexual status to all other red foxes that pass by.  In addition, foxes mark their cached prey to indicate whether any food remains to be eaten.  Foxes leave scent marks along the boundary of their territory, as well as within it.  Often you will find both urine and scat placed strategically on elevated objects, such as rocks, stumps and vegetation emerging from snow as well as at the intersection of two trails.  Both male and female foxes leave scent marks. Researchers have found that when foxes are looking for food, they mark up to 70 times an hour!  When just traveling and not  hunting, they do not mark as frequently.  During their breeding season, which peaks in February, male fox urine takes on a strong skunk-like odor. Only during the past week have I begun to notice this scent where foxes have marked.