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Baltimore Orioles Fledging

6-28-19 baltimore oriole family 0U1A0415After arriving back in Vermont in May, Baltimore Orioles mate, build their nest (female only) near the tip of an outer branch of an isolated tree (discouraging predation), lay eggs and incubate them for about two weeks before they hatch.

After spending the next two weeks in the nest, most nestlings are ready to fledge. It is at this point that you can actually see the nestlings as they cling to the outside of their pendulous nest, or perch on its rim as they noisily await the arrival of a parent with an insect morsel. Upon fledging, they can fly, but not very far. The parents will continue to keep an eye on them and feed them during these vulnerable first two weeks out of the nest until they can fend for themselves. (Many thanks to Nina and Jerry Hickson for photo opportunity.) (Photo: Male (topmost bird), female and nestling Baltimore Oriole)

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12 responses

  1. janetpesaturo

    Awesome photo.

    June 28, 2019 at 7:50 am

  2. Pam Bullock

    Hi Mary-

    This reminds me, I think I heard somewhere along the way that Orioles were no longer “Baltimore” Orioles, just Orioles or maybe Northern Orioles? Who decides a name change?

    Thanks,

    P

    June 28, 2019 at 8:19 am

    • The Birds of North and Middle America Checklist is the official source on the taxonomy of birds found in North and Middle America, including adjacent islands. This list is produced by the North American Classification Committee (NACC), an official committee of the American Ornithological Society. You can see the checklist at http://checklist.aou.org/taxa/. I believe Baltimore Oriole is still the accepted common name!

      June 28, 2019 at 8:40 am

  3. Penny

    Whole family in one shot!! Great picture, Mary!

    June 28, 2019 at 8:22 am

  4. Alice Pratt

    I’m glad you are doing a post about them, Mary! The family has a nice home, an amazing nest. They have the prettiest song.

    June 28, 2019 at 8:23 am

  5. Here in Ontario, Canada the Baltimore Orioles and other migratories were late crossing Lake Ontario due to cold weather. Then we got a break on May 18 and a lot of migratories crossed the lake that night. I had 8 Baltimore Orioles on my property the next morning, along with Indigo Buntings and many other species. It was so late that many immediately starting setting up nest areas right away. I still have one breeding pair here, I don’t know where the nest is, but that is ok. I still see the male. I also have another male here, plus 2 immature males and an immature female. It has been a year where the colour orange has been flashing around my property in waves. I hope I get to see their young.

    June 28, 2019 at 8:27 am

  6. Jo-Ann

    Is that why they are so quiet now…not a peep but they still come to the feeder?

    June 28, 2019 at 9:19 am

    • Yes, song birds in general are much more vocal when courting is going on. Some continue to sing during nesting, but once nesting is over, much of the singing is over!

      June 28, 2019 at 9:23 am

      • Alice Pratt

        They might be tired from raising their young! 😁

        June 28, 2019 at 12:48 pm

  7. Betty Gatewood

    Hi, Mary! We LOVE all your posts and always learn so much! Mark and I will be visiting Vermont next month and hope to touch base with you then. Is this the best way to contact you?

    *Betty Gatewood……….*

    *”I want to paint like the bird sings.” * *Claude Monet*

    On Fri, Jun 28, 2019 at 7:41 AM Naturally Curious with Mary Holland wrote:

    > Mary Holland posted: “After arriving back in Vermont in May, Baltimore > Orioles mate, build their nest (female only) near the tip of an outer > branch of an isolated tree (discouraging predation), lay eggs and incubate > them for about two weeks before they hatch. After spending” >

    June 28, 2019 at 3:40 pm

  8. Hi Betty,
    My email address is probably the best way to reach me — mholland@vermontel.net. I would love to see you and Mark!

    June 28, 2019 at 4:38 pm

  9. Thanks.

    M.

    Marlene Vidibor wildbraidart.com wildbraidart.etsy.com “Like” me at https://www.facebook.com/pages/wildbraidart/116041095100245

    June 28, 2019 at 11:21 pm

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